| Contact
     
     
     
Home Quick Links Explore States Explore Themes Exclusive Services Maps of India Responsible Tourism Package Tours Accommodation
 
Home > Explore by Theme > Eco Tourism > Wildlife in India
 
 
 
 
  Explore by Theme >>> Eco Tourism
 

Wildlife in India

 
Have some close encounters within the wilds! Indian heritage is enriched with a magnificent range of wildlife. Visit Gir, the only habitat of Asiatic Lions but do not forget to take a look at the lesser known wildlife and avifauna of this sanctuary too. There's Kaziranga, abode of the Great One Horned Rhino.
Jim Corbett, Manas, the Great Himalayan National Park and Periyar Wildlife Sanctuary are some other wildlife sanctuaries, which are on a mission to save the most exquisite and endangered species of India. India's flora is also among the richest in the world. Evergreen forest in the northeast and along the Western Ghats, moist and dry Deciduous forests, swampy marshes, estuaries and lagoons shelter unique forms of plant and animal life.
Wildlife is not just about animals, but birds too. Usually when people visit the wildlife sanctuaries, they miss out the avifauna of that wild hub, because the major scene stealers of any wildlife are predators like Tigers and Leopards. Still, if you ever get a chance to visit the bird sanctuaries of India, make sure to pay more attention on bird watching and you'll know why this sport is catching up as the best wildlife leisure activity in India.
Check out some of the popular bird sanctuaries in India such as Bharatpur or Keoladeo Ghana National Park that is blessed with some of the most exquisite avifauna and a delightful sight for any bird watcher. Some of the major residents of Bharatpur sanctuary include 375 species of birds, numerous mammals and reptiles. Corbett National park is another bird hideout, especially when it comes to the avian treasures of the Himalayan region. A boat cruise from Boothathenkeru to Thattekad is an unforgettable birding experience through the evergreen forests nesting migratory and indigenous birds.
 
Wildlife Parks in India
Depending on the area and terrain National Parks provide ample opportunities to the visitors to have a close encounters with the wilds. But what is so exquisite about the Indian National Parks is the variance that they are equipped with. Whether it comes to the flora, avifauna, and aquafauna, or witnessing various wild forms in their natural surroundings on an elephant or inside a jeep, wild ventures in are simply amazing!
Some of the best jewels of Indian wilderness include the Great Himalayan National Park, Dachigam National Park near Srinagar, Corbett National Park in Uttar Pradesh, which is also a famous tiger reserve, Ranthambore National Park in Rajasthan, and Sundarbans National Park in West Bengal. Worth visiting in the east indian part in "The Land of Rhino" Assam is Kaziranga.
Famous National Parks in India
Bandhavgarh National Park :- The thick forest of Bandhavgarh National Park sits in a bowl encircled by cliffs and wooded Vindhyan mountains, and its plains have a number of grass and reed covered wetlands where Kingfishers dive and Egrets sit poised, hunch-backed, in the shallows. Up above, vultures nestle in holes in the sheer cliffs.
The Bandhavgarh jungle, when it is large enough, becomes a living self-sustaining organism providing its own climate, atmosphere, water and nutrition through its recycling systems. It even has a sleep wake cycle. As more light fills the sky, Bandhavgarh begins to awaken.
Ranthambore National Park :-Situated in Eastern Rajasthan, where the Aravali Hill ranges and the Vindhyan plateau meet, the Ranthambhore National Park was once the hunting preserve of the Maharajas of Jaipur. The rivers Chambal in the South and Banas in the North bound the Ranthambore National Park.
Six man made lakes are the central focus of the park and many perennial streams criss-cross the entire park. The Ranthambore National Park has internal drainage and has no link up with any river system, even though two rivers bound the Park in it’s north and south side.
Kaziranga National Park :- Located on the banks of the mighty Brahmaputra River in the far North East of India, Assam, Kaziranga National Park covers an area of approximately 430-sq-kms with its swamps and tall thickets of elephant grass making it the ideal habitat for the Indian One-Horned Rhino. Due to limitless poaching of this prehistoric survivor, the Kaziranga National Park was declared a wildlife sanctuary in 1940.
Kanha National Park :- How many of you have seen a tiger before? Most of the answers will be ambiguous because everyone wants to see a tiger. Then where can one spot a tiger? Well, even if there are circuses and zoo's all over India, there's some kind of a thrill you experiences when all of a sudden you came across a Tiger roaming freely in the wilderness of its natural habitat: the fields and forests of India. There are numerous Tiger reserves in India, that are preserving this ferocious beast, but nowhere can you see them as often, and as regularly as in Kanha National Park.
Located in the Mandla district of Madhya Pradesh, Kanha national park cum Tiger reserve extends over an area of over 1,940-sq-kms. The major feature of this region's interesting topography is the horseshoe shape valley and the whole park area is surrounded by the spurs of the Mekal. The Surpan River meanders through Kanha's central Maidans, grasslands that cover the extensive plateau. Steep rocky escrapments along the edges offer breathtaking views of the valley.
Sundarbans National Park :- The vast swampy delta of the two great Indian rivers, Brahamaputra and the Ganges extends over areas comprising of mangrove forests, swamps and forest island all interwoven in a network of small rivers and streams. The Sundarbans National Park, home of the Royal Bengal Tiger covering an area of approximately 1330.10-sq-kms and the largest mangrove forest in the world, form the core of this area. The Sundarban region has got its name from Sundari trees, once found in abundance here.
The Ganges and the Brahmaputra form this alluvial archipelago of 54 islands watered by the Bay of Bengal. The islands Goasaba, Sandeshkali and Basanti form the northern boundary of the Sundarbans; on the south is the sea; to the west side of the Sunderbans park is the Matla and Bidya Rivers and to the east is the international boundary of Bangladesh.
Manas National Park :- Manas National Park is situated on the foothills of the Himalayas and a part of it extends to Bhutan. It was declared a sanctuary on October 01, 1928 and was designated a World Heritage site in December 1985. The sanctuary is home to a great variety of wildlife, including tiger, Golden Langur, Wild Buffalo, Hispid Hare, Pigmy Hog, Capped Langur, Indian one-horned Rhinoceros, Elephant, Gaur, Hog Deer, etc.
Manas known for its Project Tigers, Rhinos & Elephants, and is Assam's one of the two Tiger projects. The scenic beauty and rare wealth of wild life combine with this unique world heritage site to offer one of the most enthralling experiences.
Bandipur National Park :- Halfway down the Mysore-Ooty highway, the Deccan Plateau rises to meet the wrinkled folds of the Western Ghat mountains. Here lies one of India's best-known wildlife reserves - Bandipur National Park. It is situated within Chamarajanagar district in the southern Indian state of Karnataka, and abuts the states of Tamil Nadu & Kerala. Endowed with a moderate climate and diverse geographical features, the park supports a remarkable variety of flora and fauna, making it a veritable paradise for wildlife.
In 1973, Bandipur became one of the first of India's Tiger Reserves and the southernmost of the nine reserves specially established under Project Tiger. In 1974, intention was declared under the Wildlife Protection Act to notify it as a National Park.
Sultanpur National Park :- Sultanpur, 46 kms to the south-west of Delhi, is a green haven with a lake and wild birds. Sultanpur was declared a water-bird reserve in 1972 and its grounds are lush with lawns and trees and shrubs and masses of bougainvillea. It is recommended to spend some time in the small museum and library in the reserve, as one gets a fair idea of the birds and creatures you are likely to see during your visit to the reserve. A good pair of binoculars is a must to clearly observe the wildlife from a safe distance, without disturbing them.
Sultanpur is essentially a bird watching place with few trees obscuring the visitor's view of the lake. The birds can be easily spotted wading, swimming or flying. All this is possible, because the visitors are not allowed to paddle around in boats in this water bird sanctuary, thus allowing the birds to continue with their activities without human interference. One can very easily spot grey pelicans, cormorants, grey and pond herons, egrets, painted storks who tend to congregate and preen. The black-necked storks, white ibis, spoonbills, etc can also be spotted.
Corbett National Park :- Corbett National park is known for its varied wildlife, and as the site for the launching of Project Tiger. Corbett National Park was one of the nine tiger reserves created at the launch of the Project Tiger in 1973. The original area of the Corbett National Park was 323.75 sq. km. to which 197.07 sq. km. was added later. In 1991, an area of 797.72 sq km was added as buffer area of the Corbett Tiger Reserve. It area includes kalagarh forest division and Ramnagar forest division.
The Main wildlife animals found in the Corbett National Park include the tiger, elephant, chital, sambar, nilgai, gharial, King Cobra, muntjac, wild boar, hedgehog, common musk shrew, flying fox, Indian Pangolin, and nearly 600 species of birds. Corbett National Park receives thousands of visitors every year. A variety of facilities are available to house tourists within and outside the park.
Gir National Park :- Gir National Park & Wildlife Sanctuary comprises 1412 sq km of deciduous forest interspersed with semi-evergreen and evergreen flora, acacia, scrub jungle, grasslands and rocky hills. Fed by perennial and seasonal rivers and streams, the sanctuary has large water bodies like the Kamleshwar Dam that are good for crocodiles and birds.
Panna National Park :- Panna National Park is situated in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, at a distance of around 57 km from Khajuraho. The region, famous for its diamond industry, is also home to some of the best wildlife species in India and is one of the most famous Tiger Reserves in the country. The park is known worldwide for its wild cats, including tigers as well as deer and antelope. Due to its closeness to one of the best-known Indian tourist attraction in India, Khajuraho, the park is recognized as an exciting stop-over destination.
 
 
 
|  All Rights Reserved © indiatourismecatalog.com  |